Jump to content

Our Official NAGF Flags

are now available in the NAGF Online Store in TWO Sizes! Don't miss your chance of being one of the first to fly the new high visibility NAGF Flag!!!

 

Click Here To Go To the NAGF Online Store!!!

 

Snag_1ffcf50.png

NAGF Admin NAGF Admin
NAGF News Ticker
     
  • Happy New Year and Welcome to 2019!!!
  • New Members are always welome!!!
  • NASR 12!!!
Mountain Rider

Dark side tire?

37 posts in this topic Last Reply

Recommended Posts

AZgl1800

I like that round profile, the Michie I have is more flat, and definitely wants to stand up at slow speeds, and crawls up rough ridges on paved roads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mountain Rider

The bike isn't happy just having the new rear, tried to no hand it on the way to work and the death wobble raised it's ugly head. Fortunately, the new front should be here tomorrow.  I may play with the air pressure and see if there's a sweet spot that removes the wobble. It's definitely from the front. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AZgl1800

make sure the front tire is 40 psi or more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Monkeytrucker

Ours developed the death wobble at about 12k miles.  After the post bearings were retorqued all was well and has stayed that way.  Evidently Mother Honda was lax on original torque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mountain Rider

The new front tire arrived today, so tonight I'm mounting it up and will do the brakes while I'm at it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mountain Rider
(edited)

Well, we're a couple hundred miles into the Darkside of things and I must say I like it. Both tires seem to have settled in, so I haven't experienced any wobble for a while. I'm going to play with the air pressure a bit and see how that feels. I currently have 40 psi in the front and 38 PSI in the rear. It rides well, but feels a little bouncy in the rear, so I don't know if I need to preload the rear suspension a bit more, lower the tire pressure to soften the ride, or increase it to make it more solid. Once I get it fine tuned, we'll be set. Leslie now ask me to go riding, a lot, so we're doing very good, but better is always better. 

:SmileyTooth:

 

Edited by Mountain Rider
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AZgl1800

I like to keep the front tire at 40-44 psi, and the rear tire, a Michelin RF ZP had to experiment with it a lot.

 

started at 50 psi "because you have to" it ain't a bike tire.

That proved to be like riding on concrete wheels.

 

Dropped to 24 psi and it glided along wonderfully, but in the twistys it is a trifle squirrely.

I pull a trailer a lot, and ended up at 34 psi for overall comfort.  Right where a car tire is supposed to be according to the side wall.

 

Have never experienced any wobble on my '02 with the current E3 on the front, and the Michelin on the rear.

 

a new front tire is going on this week, an Avon Roadrider rear tire, and it will be set at 44 psi...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zzww91

I run a run flat tire on my 1800. A Bridgestone Blizzard LM60  195/55/R16 tubeless run flat...love it, doesn't feel like a car tire. It feels more like a bike tire. It leans without any hesitation. This is my third run flat and this is the best one yet. I run the air pressure with 1 up at 28 lbs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Slammerman

What kind of ct did u put on on there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ghost Rider 2

  I use a  Pirelli P 1 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mountain Rider

The Pirelli P1 is what I'm running based on Jerry's recommendation.  The P1 is a great tire.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
terryj

First of all, I really don't care what type of tire you choose to install on your bike as long as you ride with that in mind. Have you ever wondered why motorcycle tires have such a stiff sidewall and car tires have a more flexible sidewall? It is due to the physics of driving a single track (motorcycle) vehicle as compared to a dual track (car). When navigating a corner on a motorcycle there are three forces involved, centrifugal force, camber thrust and gravity, all three of these forces rely on your tires to get you through the corner. Camber thrust, in basic terms, is the force that is exerted when leaning the bike into a turn, the greater the lean the greater the camber thrust, the greater the speed the greater the camber thrust. This is why motorcycle tires are constructed in a "U" shape and the sidewalls are very stiff as to not allow the sidewall to flex in a corner. Then there is centrifugal force, this force want to push you toward the outside of the corner, there by adding more weight exerted to the tires and adding to the camber thrust exerted on the tires. And now we come to gravity, this force wants to pull you down, so we maintain speed in the corners as to keep our lean angle in balance with gravity, however, if to much speed is increase then we exceed the slip angle of the tires and the bike goes down.  

 

On a car, there is no camber thrust because the car doesn't lean in corning and the car wants to keep all 4 tires contact patch on the road, so the sidewall flex because of the weight of the automobile and the centrifugal force applied to to the tires. Due to cars not leaning into a corner and this cause the car to want to continue in a straight line thereby causing the turning force to be greater in an automobile than that of a motorcycle. This is why automobile tires incorporate flexing into their sidewalls as to allow the contact patch of the tire to remain in contact with the road to reduce the slip angle of the tires. Due to a motorcycle being able to lean into corner the slip angle is somewhat reduced, allowing the corner to be take at a higher speed than that of an automobile, this is due to the stiff sidewall construction of the motorcycle tire. 

 

At the speed that most of us motorcyclist drive these forces don't really matter on which type of tires we use, however, most racing bike bikes use motorcycle tires designed for them, but they are still motorcycle tires. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use,