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Mountain Rider

Dark side tire?

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Mountain Rider

Looking at the tires on Black Beauty and have decided I'm going to replace them. They've got a few miles left on them, but I figure why not start out fresh. The old rear tire is a low profile, 195/50 - 16, and sets so low the bike sets straight up on the side stand (actually fell over at the DMV). If I read correctly, I should have a 195/55 - 16, which should set a bit taller and allow for a little more lean on the stand. 

 

All that aside, do I need to run a bias or radial tire?  I thought it was a bias, and the guy at Discount Tire said he never heard of a bias car tire, so I assume he's a youngster. His boss was polite enough to inform me they didn't service motorcycles.  So, what are we running?  I thought about a Hancook or Yokohama, but again, those are radials. 

 

By the way, I do like the way the bike rides on that CT. 😁

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Dusty Boots

Never heard of a tire of that size being a Bias ply. Most (if not all) car tires nowadays are radials.

I run a Yok Avid ENVigor ZPS 195/55RF16, which is a run flat on my 1500 and will be installing one shortly on my Victory XCT

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OnaWingandaPrayer
(edited)

I bought my bike with a Michelin Primacy Alpin ZP  195/55-R16  87H.

After a screw punctured that tire , I installed a Dunlop SP WinterSport 3D  DSST  ROF     195/55-R16   87H  .

 Both of these tires are run flat technology.

I have no issue with the bike not leaning on the side stand . Perhaps you need a little more lift of the rear suspension?

 

BTW the 1800 comes standard with radial tires.

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AZgl1800

My '02 came with an aftermarket side stand on it, and even with the Michelin ZP RF tire on it, the lean angle is something fierce.

It is hard for me to pull it back up to vertical, have to put a lot of weight on the right foot peg to get it to come over.

 

So, far, no screws or nails in my tires.

I do have a spare Michelin if someone close needs a tire, I think the one I have is going to last me for more than 5 years at the rate it is lasting.

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jobe05

Any, Radial Car Tire in the size you need will work.  I also ran the Yoko Envigor and loved it.  Mine to was a run flat tire.  I liked the idea if the tire was flat, I could still drive it to a place it could be repaired.  HOWEVER!!!!  The only way to know it's flt, or out of air, is with a TPMs sytem on the bike.  Look up "Tire Gard" on wingstuff web site.   THey are easy to install and seem to hold up well.  I have had mine for several years now.  I change the batteries in the tire piece in the spring (just in case) and put a new AAA in the key fob read out, which I have velcro'ed to the Goldwing badge on the trim piece between the gas tank flap and the ignition.  Easy to see there.

 

A lot of tire places won't mout a Car Tire on a motor cycle, and vis a versa.  Just tell them it goes on the left side of your trailer.

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Mountain Rider

Ah, so I had my head in rectal defilade. So a good quality radial with a symmetrical tread pattern should be fine?  I think I'll throw either an Avon or Michelin on the front

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AZgl1800

I bought an Avon Roadrider for the front.

 

as DaveO430  is on this 5th Avon Roadrider rear tire for the front....   I went with that.

got it from Dennis Kirk, ordered it Friday night, here on Monday.

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Mountain Rider
(edited)

As long as I'm in an asking mood, what's with the rear tire on the front?  I'm in uncharted territory here. 

 

And what size?

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Steed

I only have ST experience in the Double Darkness.  It seems that most rear tires start out with 2 or 3/32's more/deeper tread than front tires of the same style.  Some have a slightly harder center compound,  and some are even dual compound, the general idea is to get longer tread life for your buying dollar.

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Mountain Rider

Now that makes sense. I guess I'll get on Amazon tonight and do some shopping. :SmileyTooth:

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AZgl1800

yes, the deeper tread gives us more miles/$$

 

and, generally a better water shedding tread design, and bit better anti-skid grip than a typical "front tire".

a lot of folks, me and DaveO430 included, reverse the tire so it runs "backwards" for normal travel.

 

The idea is, that if you have to grab a double handful of front brakes, that the tire will have better adhesion to the pavement and won't slide on you.  And they seem to be better in the wet weather traction than something like the E3.

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Ghost Rider 2

  I prefer the Pirelli P1 run flat.  Tire is slightly rounded on the edge, plus it only weighs 21 pounds.  Tire works fantastic.  As for front I still use the Bridgestone 709.  Sticks like glue on wet or dry road.  I have never tried to mix a radial rear and a bias ply front. On a 2 wheeler.  My wifes trike has a bias Michelin Pilot Active and works fine on it and gets good milage wear. 

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Mountain Rider

Thanks for all the information, greatly appreciated.  I should have a shiny new Hankook Optimo 426 86T in hand on Tuesday.  Wednesday after work I'm going to make use of the shop tire machine and get her changed out. 

 

Now here's a new question.  I cruised through some post on the Darkside Forum, and several guys made mention of using Airsoft beads to balance their tires.  Are they really using those to balance their tires?  I understand 3 oz of beads are 3 oz of beads, whether ceramic or plastic.  Kinda like the pound of feathers vs a pound of lead, they both weigh 1 pound.  If they work, why would we pay $20 for a couple oz of Dyna beads as opposed to $3 for a whole bottle of Airsoft beads.

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OnaWingandaPrayer

I have not used Airsoft beads . Will they go in thru the valve stem ? That might be one reason they are not used as much. 

I install ceramic beads before I slip the second bead over the rim . By that method , I expect the airsoft would be fine. Perhaps they would make a little more noise starting off and stopping ?

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Ghost Rider 2

  Tire balance is for a small location.  ceramic beads are heavy and can put weight in a small spot.  (were the tire is light) air soft beads are light and would take a peanut butter jar full.  I don't think the results would be good.  Also Dyna beads are best for a bike.  If you buy the cheaper ebay beads they will not fit threw the valve stem. Then you have to break down bead and pour in from the side.  Normally that causes a mess.  If you trap beads in the bead you get air leak.  Just remember one simple rule.  With a 1800 Goldwing the best parts or accessories  are just barely good enough.   

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Mountain Rider

Point taken. :thumbs-up:

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AZgl1800

what has been said.

Dyna Beads go thru the valve stem with ease.

 

other sized beads require the tire rim to be broken down a bit.

 

but once inside the tire, beads is beads.

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Dusty Boots

Funny.....  I just measured out some 2 & 3 oz packages of some Air Soft BBS to try out when I install my new tires shortly.

 

 

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Seeing as I change my own tires, I'm not worried about the fact they don't fir through the air valve core. Actually better that way as there is no fear of them clogging up the valve if the tire valve isn't positioned correctly when you check the tire pressure like the others

 

Dusty

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Mountain Rider

See, I'm changing my own tire, hence the speculation. I may try it just for grins and giggles, if it doesn't work, I'm the one who has to pull them out. What do you think, CT and 3 oz?

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Ghost Rider 2

  :QUESTION: 

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Dusty Boots

Yes, I am going with 3 ozs for the rear CT and 2 ozs up front.

Same as what's recommended for any bead

 

 

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Monkeytrucker

That is about the weight we used.  Put ours in thru the valve stem.  Best thing we did tire wise.

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Mountain Rider

Went with the Avon Road Rider rear tire for the front.  I figured if I'm going to jump in the deep end of the pool, I might as well jump in with both feet.  She's going to be very happy, new tires, front and rear, new brakes, front and rear, new oil and filter, and new brake fluid.  I'll take a look at the fluid for the clutch tonight.

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Mountain Rider
On 4/28/2018 at 3:48 PM, Ghost Rider 2 said:

  :QUESTION: 

 

Yeah, I know.  Sometimes I just have to try something so I can say I did.  After all, not everyone thinks putting a car tire on a bike is a good idea either.  If it works, great!  If not, I'll fix it and come back here so you can tell me "I told you so".  And, I'll gladly let you do it.

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Mountain Rider
(edited)

Well, the new Hankook is on the bike.  It went way to easy, from the time we laid her on her side, until she was back upright, was 30 minutes.  The old tire came off without a fight, and the new tire slid right on and the bead set with a mere 30PSI.  About 3.5 oz of airsoft beads were installed as the tire was installed, and during the ride home, I'd have to say they work just fine as the ride was very smooth.  I love the rounded profile of this tire, it handles just like a motorcycle tire, but gives the feel of the CT, anchoring the bike to the road.  Going into the corners, it lays over and tracks very well.  I can hardly wait for the new front and brake pads so I can get them on.  The old tire was well into the wear bars, so the PO got his moneys worth.

 

You all were right, I'll never return to a MT. 

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