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CrystalPistol

You can never be too careful .......

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CrystalPistol

 Just sitting here, watching some TV, reflecting on that supper at Cracker Barrel, and reading the boards ......

 

Monkeytrucker posted in part elsewhere  the below and it reminded me of some several instances where I investigated a grievous injury or   loss of life.

  ... etc ... crawled under the car to put the exhaust pipes back onto the headers so dad would not know he had been street racing (yeah, duh?).  He forgot to set the brake and the car rolled over him breaking his pelvis and hips.  After a long recovery which left him crippled up  ... etc ...

Over the length of my LE  career I responded to several incidents  that I recall where a vehicle fell / rolled over someone working under them.  These below stand out in my memory.    

  • One was a hydraulic jack collapsed and no stands .... he was found when his wife got supper ready and came out to tell him.
  • One was the cinderblock under the frame that just "crushed" like, he had placed it sideways with holes horizontal and just had the frame resting on the block's sides.  A neighbor drove by and noticed it looked like something under the car and stopped to check.
  • One other ...  the guy was gonna work under his late '60s Chevy PU and used some ramps fashioned from what looked like fire wood and scrap lumber cutoffs.  The round firewood piece under the ramp part rolled and the truck's tire ended up on his head, his body was under the front cross member and lower control arm .... looked like he was trying to get out quickly .... I think he knew what was happening.   Family member found him after midnight when he never came in. 
  • There was another on the interstate shoulder changing a tire back in the late '70s when I was a new trooper, he used a bumper jack and was wrestling the spare into place when the car just went forwards and the right rear fender pinned one of his legs to the ground.  Was a Chevy Nova.  Didn't take his leg off .... but he wasn't gonna get up.   I just came along and found him there on I-95 just north of Dale City .... called rescue and quickly reset his jack and got it up far enough he drug his leg out .... broke it though.   

There are others, but those are some that did not involve intoxication .... just a moment of distraction or lack of focus that lead to someone putting themselves in a bad spot.  

 

I don't even get under my Trike or a Bike unless I am 100% sure there is no way to have the beast somehow find it's way on top of me.  

 

Same with my 4 wheel vehicles.

 

When  I use my MC jack to raise the '85 GL1200 I get it up, and then I place two jack stands at the rear under each saddle bag guard with rubber pads for the jack stand cradle and I have two other trailer jacks that are a little shorter that I remove the jack screws from and set in place under the two front lower motor mounts which sit nestled in the recesses.  When secure, I move the MC jack out of my way.

The trike either get's the rear set up on real ramps with stops and a removable front chock .... or it get's set up on jack stands.   The front may or may not get raised depending on what I'm doing, but if raised I either block under the engine with wood or set a third ramp under the front tire, I do not go under with just a hydraulic jack holding one up. 

The Triumph .... like when I redid the steering stem bearings ... I removed the tank and seat and hung the bike from the 6X12 beam running under my 2x12 floor joists.  Use a come-a-long to raise it & then set a proof coil logging chain as a safety  (actually .... I only ever needed to do that that one time).

Even when changing / sharpening the blades on my Wheel@Horse  (@ maybe ain't a horse head tractor lugged wheel ... but it's close) or doing other maintenance underneath, it's raised with  a come-a-long and then I set a safety chain as well. 

How about y'all ............   :puzzled-smiley-emoticon:  
 

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zipp

You know that those of use that are or were in LE should have kept a journal because you just cant make this stuff up. Zipp

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CrystalPistol

Oh, I know ..... many times I've considered writing a  book.       A retired Wyoming Trooper I have come to know mostly through writings last 10-15 years via forums, FB, email .... wrote a few though .... makes some good reading.    If I ever make it back to southern Wy, we are supposed to split a pie and pot of coffee.  

 

I did keep a "Daybook" with sketchy notes each year, always 10-41&42 times, meal costs, stats for each day to help with weeklies, but space in it was limited .... but I did note the "unusual".  Still have all my 31+ years worth and in last 20 or so, also a Dept log book with incident codes and time graphs, etc.    Kept the photos as well as reconstruction notes of more serious events. 

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