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#1 Galaxyhunter

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

When you are riding with a second , third rider or in a group, how much time are you looking in your mirrors checking on the riders behind you?

 

The situation I came across yesterday,  I was riding through Galena, Il & was stopped at a traffic light (nothing new there),  From the left, four riders turn & are traveling the same direction as me.  The first two where Males riding one-up, Then a two-up, last was a Female one-up (I'll call Toni for the story).  They happened to turn on the same semi-twisty road that leads out of town that I planed to ride.  I stayed back 200 - 300 yards so not to crowd them ( I was going roughly 35-40 mph).  About 3-4 miles out, I started up a hill,  Toni just crested the hill where there was a slight left hand curve. As the bike went out of sight, that last thing I saw was the brake light & a small dust cloud.  As there was many people mowing their yards, I didn't think much of the cloud.  As I crest the hill & make the curve, I noticed that Toni was picking herself up in the ditch.  I stopped & turned around to go back to check on her, AS I was turning around, the two-up bike was turning around.  They must have noticed that the rider was no longer there.  I get off my bike,  Toni was yelling & kicking parts of her bike that broke off.  She had taken out a mailbox,  She had a big gash on her forehead & a slight rash on her chest. She wasn't bleeding to bad.  By then the two-up bike has returned & the female from that bike came running over with water & a towel.  Toni refused to call for medics.  We pickup her bike & I decide there is nothing for me to do there. I might have been there for 4 - 5 minutes.  I get back on my bike, turn around to continue home.  About 2 miles down the road, the first two bikes are headed back.  

 

That got me to thinking that they must hardly EVER look in their  mirrors to check on their riding partners.  I know that when I'm riding with anybody, I'm always looking to see where they are at.   Must be the one thing that the High School drivers Ed teacher said that has always stuck with me.  ALWAYS have a way out.  meaning, check your mirrors often, know who & what is around you in case you have to make an evasive move.


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#2 DaveO430

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

I always keep an eye on the riders behind me, maybe I worry too much but I like to have all of them in my sight if there is a straight stretch. I lead the ride most of the time and feel like it's my responsibility. I also stop at any intersection until everyone catches up. One who shall remain nameless makes this very hard as he likes to follow about 1/2 mile back no matter how slow I go waiting for him.  :roflmao:



#3 youngnbald

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

It is sad that people don't watch for others.  I always keep an eye on people behind me.  My own family members needed a lesson with this during a snowmobile trip in Wisconsin.  I took the rear, my brother was lead and my parents were in the middle.  It was pitch black and I knew they missed our turn to return to the cabin.  I flashed my lights and tried to signal the best I could.  No response.  I pulled off and shut down my machine.  They were gone.  15-20 minutes later, they returned and asked what happened.  I could not believe it!  I was waiting at the turn off to our cabin.  They said they were lost.  I pointed and said I knew all along, but no one watched for the tail.  If an emergency was to happen, sad to say family wouldn't have been there!

I lead at times and will always know if we lost a rider in a light or any emergency situation.  In small groups, I even lane change when EVERYONE has a good opportunity.  Maybe I care to much too Carl.



#4 DaveO430

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

  In small groups, I even lane change when EVERYONE has a good opportunity.  

 

That's something others need to learn also. Hard to stay with the leader when he's switching lanes all the time. 



#5 Galaxyhunter

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

When I'm leading & in moderate to heavy traffic and I want the switch lanes, I'll ask the trail bike to grab the lane when he has the chance.  That way, all the other bikes can fall in and stay together.


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#6 AZgl1800

 
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Posted 2 weeks ago

I always keep an eye on the riders behind me, maybe I worry too much but I like to have all of them in my sight if there is a straight stretch. I lead the ride most of the time and feel like it's my responsibility. I also stop at any intersection until everyone catches up. One who shall remain nameless makes this very hard as he likes to follow about 1/2 mile back no matter how slow I go waiting for him.  :roflmao:

 

 

hmmmm?

 

that sounds like one of my riding partners :roflmao:

 

I am usually Tail End Charlie, and I like to follow about 7 to 15 seconds behind...



#7 yooperfan

 
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Posted A week ago

I agree with making passes when all riders can pass together and try for the same with making it through a stoplight, but that doesn't always work if the other bikes are lagging too far behind.  If I make a light and others don't, I wait on the other side, so we don't get separated, since riding together is the purpose of going on a ride together.  If I'm following, I stay close enough to ensure I can make the light with the lead bike.  Leading or following, I like to leave together at stop signs also.

Everyone probably has a horror story of riding together.  I have many, all from riding my ATV in Michigan's U.P..  I rode for 10 years with a friend (Wayne) from there.  He always led the way, since he knew where he was going and I didn't.  More than once, he would get out of my site long enough for me to not notice which way he turned at a fork in the trail.  I would stop and wait from him to return rather than trying to guess and risking making the wrong choice.  It was easier than getting separated and wasting a lot of time trying to find each other, which happened when his brother rode with us and took a wrong turn.  The worst was on that same trip. My Wayne claimed all he could see was his brother's light and nothing behind that.  His brother (not the sharpest tool in the shed) didn't bother to notice that another friend (Jim) and myself were no longer behind him.  We had to maneuver over 2 fallen trees and by the time we were done, the other 2 had rounded a curve and were gone out of site.  The trail ahead had a fork to the right and soon after, it came to a T intersection.  I tried to read the tire tracks to decide which way they may have gone, but that didn't work too well in the dark, so that's where we stopped and waited for them to return.   Wayne was carrying our extra gas, and we didn't have enough to get back to town, even if we knew where that was.  It was midnight and chilly, about 40*.  We spent the night in an old army truck that was being used for logging in the area.   Wayne finally returned, at about 8 AM.  I'm sure at one point, they were aware of our absence, but the brother had something to do early in the morning, so he had to get home.  Wayne refueled, ate breakfast, and then came looking for us.  It was a long, 3 hour ride back to town.  The whole trip lasted 24 hours.  Jim was ready to kill them both and would never ride with them again.



#8 DaveO430

 
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Posted A week ago

hmmmm?

 

that sounds like one of my riding partners :roflmao:

 

I am usually Tail End Charlie, and I like to follow about 7 to 15 seconds behind...

 

And that's too far. 3 to 5 seconds is plenty. 



#9 Galaxyhunter

 
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Posted A week ago

I agree with making passes when all riders can pass together and try for the same with making it through a stoplight, but that doesn't always work if the other bikes are lagging too far behind.  If I make a light and others don't, I wait on the other side, so we don't get separated, since riding together is the purpose of going on a ride together.  If I'm following, I stay close enough to ensure I can make the light with the lead bike.  Leading or following, I like to leave together at stop signs also.

Everyone probably has a horror story of riding together.  I have many, all from riding my ATV in Michigan's U.P..  I rode for 10 years with a friend (Wayne) from there.  He always led the way, since he knew where he was going and I didn't.  More than once, he would get out of my site long enough for me to not notice which way he turned at a fork in the trail.  I would stop and wait from him to return rather than trying to guess and risking making the wrong choice.  It was easier than getting separated and wasting a lot of time trying to find each other, which happened when his brother rode with us and took a wrong turn.  The worst was on that same trip. My Wayne claimed all he could see was his brother's light and nothing behind that.  His brother (not the sharpest tool in the shed) didn't bother to notice that another friend (Jim) and myself were no longer behind him.  We had to maneuver over 2 fallen trees and by the time we were done, the other 2 had rounded a curve and were gone out of site.  The trail ahead had a fork to the right and soon after, it came to a T intersection.  I tried to read the tire tracks to decide which way they may have gone, but that didn't work too well in the dark, so that's where we stopped and waited for them to return.   Wayne was carrying our extra gas, and we didn't have enough to get back to town, even if we knew where that was.  It was midnight and chilly, about 40*.  We spent the night in an old army truck that was being used for logging in the area.   Wayne finally returned, at about 8 AM.  I'm sure at one point, they were aware of our absence, but the brother had something to do early in the morning, so he had to get home.  Wayne refueled, ate breakfast, and then came looking for us.  It was a long, 3 hour ride back to town.  The whole trip lasted 24 hours.  Jim was ready to kill them both and would never ride with them again.

 

Well when your the fourth bike & all are pulling trailers, there is no way I'm going to get through all the lights with the rest of the bikes.  I have the worst record on this planet for having to stop for lights.  And I refuse to be like 95% of the rest world that has zero conscience of running RED lights.


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#10 AZgl1800

 
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Posted A week ago

And that's too far. 3 to 5 seconds is plenty. 

 

no point in arguing about it Dave, that ain't going to happen.



#11 youngnbald

 
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Posted A week ago

And that's too far. 3 to 5 seconds is plenty. 

 

.3 to 5 seconds?  LOL.  .3 could be done, but you better know your other rider and his skills well.



#12 DaveO430

 
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Posted A week ago

no point in arguing about it Dave, that ain't going to happen.

 

 

.3 to 5 seconds?  LOL.  .3 could be done, but you better know your other rider and his skills well.

 

Really, that's plenty of time to react, unless your reaction time is so bad you shouldn't be driving/riding anyway. Try staying 5 seconds back of the car in front of you on a busy freeway. 



#13 AZgl1800

 
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Posted A week ago

Dave,

 

I drive that far back from the car in front of me all the time, I will NOT follow a vehicle up close.

 

Too many asshats that want to cut in front of you.    I follow cars on the highways at about 10 car lengths minimum everyday and don't have a problem at all with jerks that want to zoom into the space in between.

 

I drove 55 to 60 mph all the way from Austin, TX to home towing my new Toy Hauler home.... the speed limit is 70 and 75 out there on I-35... let'em have it, I don't care.



#14 DaveO430

 
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Posted A week ago

5 seconds @ 60mph is 440 feet. 






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