Jump to content




Photo
- - - - -

Tyre Wear

GL1500 Dunlop E3 tires

  • Please log in to reply

11 replies to this topic

#1 kiptap

 
kiptap

    Member

  • Members w/Sub 1
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts
  • LocationBolingbrook, IL
  • Goldwing Model:GL1500SE
  • Model Year:1996
  • First Name:Paul
 

Posted 31 May 2017 - 01:08 PM

I have been quite energetic this year and put 10K on a new set of Dunlop E3's on a GL1500.  This is my first real time with, and first set of fresh tires on the GL1500; I spoke with one of my friends who had an earlier model Goldwing, GL1200, and he stated that the front tire would outlast the rear tire at about a 2 to 1 ratio.  On my previous cycles tires wore out pretty evenly, maybe rear before front.  

 

I looked at the GL1500 rear and it looks brand new, the front tire shows a slight bit of wear, but even across from edge to edge hard to tell without a depth gauge.  So to me it looks like the front will go first.

 

I'm getting a little worried as I remember getting about 2.5 to 3 years or 30K out of tires on my previous cycle.  I am a third of the way there and its only been about four months and not even warm weather yet.  (and no, reducing riding is not an option!)  The Goldwing just chews up miles effortlessly.

 

Questions:

  1. Do the rear tires wear out faster then the fronts or vice versa on a GL1500?
  2. Ballpark mileage for GL1500 tire wear?  Specific to E3's and same question generalized.
  3. Do the treads just fall off the table really fast? e.g. (one minute your have full tread at 3/4 of the tires life and the next minute you burn the tread down really fast for the last 1/4, so you don't see it coming) Specific to E3's

 

.



#2 jobe05

 
jobe05

    Senior Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,461 posts
  • LocationKing NC
  • Goldwing Model:GL1800, GL1500
  • Model Year:2012, 1989
  • First Name:John
 

Posted 31 May 2017 - 01:18 PM

I have owned a 1200, 1500 and 1800.  My experience has been that the rears get eaten up pretty quickly on all 3.  The one common denominator, although not equal, is the torque that these bikes put out.  I could get around 18000 miles on a front tire on the 1200 and 1500, and about 22K to 24K on the 1800.

 

The rears......  Abut 10K to 12K on the 1200 and 1500 and between 6 and 8K on the 1800.  Seems the more torque, the less miles.

 

Which is why I went a different route on the 1500 and 1800, but thats not what this post is about so I won't go there......



#3 Johnny R

 
Johnny R

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 325 posts
  • LocationEdmonton, AB, Canada
  • Goldwing Model:GL1800
  • Model Year:2006
  • First Name:John
 

Posted 01 June 2017 - 08:30 PM

I wonder if you feel either a slight wobble or bounce at certain speeds. (Either tire balance or steering head not quite up to snuff.) My last 1500 had the E3's with balancing beads.  Lots of mileage and several years out of them, then traded bikes, so I don't know the end of the story.



#4 Monkeytrucker

 
Monkeytrucker

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 813 posts
  • LocationSt. Francisville, IL USA
  • Goldwing Model:1800
  • Model Year:10
  • First Name:Gary
 

Posted 04 June 2017 - 01:06 AM

definitely balance beads.  Stops the dreaded cupping.  convinced a semi driver to put them in his tires and his tire cupping has gone away.



#5 AZgl1800

 
AZgl1800

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 786 posts
  • LocationLake Oologah, OK
  • Goldwing Model:GL1800
  • Model Year:2002
  • First Name:John
 

Posted 04 June 2017 - 07:30 AM

two things will greatly help the life of any tire, and especially the E3.

 

Balance beads, and run the TPSI at 44 on the front..... on my 1500s I ran the tires at 42-44 all the time.....

pressured up to 44 and when it got down to 42, aired it back up again.

 

that will go a long way in helping to stop them from cupping.



#6 kiptap

 
kiptap

    Member

  • Members w/Sub 1
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts
  • LocationBolingbrook, IL
  • Goldwing Model:GL1500SE
  • Model Year:1996
  • First Name:Paul
 

Posted 08 June 2017 - 12:56 PM

I wonder if you feel either a slight wobble or bounce at certain speeds. (Either tire balance or steering head not quite up to snuff.) My last 1500 had the E3's with balancing beads.  Lots of mileage and several years out of them, then traded bikes, so I don't know the end of the story.

 

I have beads in both tires.  Tires are at 41 front, 40 rear. (that's the tire Max Rating)   But yes I get a bounce starting at 85 and above, unless I build up to above 85 slowly, then it seems the bounce/vibration is not there or not significant and I can press to 100, (only for finding limits).  If I drop throttle abruptly at 70 or above, then I get the same vibration.  If I put it on the center stand and put it into 5th, same vibration. 

 

The bike is like glass up to 80, hence it keeps me honest since I can't just go blasting away while on the highway and the buffeting is quite strong above 70, so I tend to stay at the posted speed limits.

 

I would love to find a fix for that.  As part of maintenance, I replaced rear bearings, rear brakes, new vibration dampers, new aluminum spacers, new u-joint, moly assembly paste on the splines, all the teeth look good to me.  I am not the first bike to complain about this EXACT issue, but no one has reported a fix for it, other than to say its the drive shaft whipping around like a jump rope at high speed.  Any EXPERIENCED answers would be appreciated.

 

 

                           "definitely balance beads.  Stops the dreaded cupping.  convinced a semi driver to put them in his tires and his tire cupping has gone away."

 

Well Galaxyhunter/Carl and another guy (can't remember his name) were extremely helpful at the 4th NAGF Illinois M&G, as my tires were cupped beyond belief, I was running 33lbs on them as that's what the manual said.  Thanks again to Carl, the other guy :confused-face-smiley-emoticon:  and Parman, for their insight on tips and NON-MANUAL suggestions during that M&G. 

 

Any yes, my cupping has not resurfaced since the new tires with beads at 40+ lbs.

 

kiptap



#7 AZgl1800

 
AZgl1800

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 786 posts
  • LocationLake Oologah, OK
  • Goldwing Model:GL1800
  • Model Year:2002
  • First Name:John
 

Posted 08 June 2017 - 01:17 PM

I have always used Dyna Beads, and never, ever had the symptoms you describe.

 

used them on two 1500s with E3 tires, and Michelin tires when they existed,

and now on my 1800 with an E3 front, and a Michelin PVT rear.



#8 kiptap

 
kiptap

    Member

  • Members w/Sub 1
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts
  • LocationBolingbrook, IL
  • Goldwing Model:GL1500SE
  • Model Year:1996
  • First Name:Paul
 

Posted 12 June 2017 - 08:41 AM

Well new development.  I noticed a couple of times when the tires were down to about 38-39lbs, the vibration above 80 was greater.  I finally checked my shock pressure and it was down from winter, about 3lbs from 40lbs.  I added air to the shocks up to 45lbs, (for the gee wiz value), and noticed that the vibration was noticeably less.  Since there was no real noticeable change to ride harshness, I decided to leave it at 45 possibly going higher based on this question.

 

I have progressive springs front and progressive air shocks rear.  What is the normal range for rear progressive air shocks for a single, 240lbs rider.  I tried looking it up, I though I read 70lbs max.  I though I read whereas you sit on the bike and measure the drop from the shock bolt, I though it was 1.5" drop for the progressives, I'm sill trying to search for where I saw, or believe I saw it.    



#9 kiptap

 
kiptap

    Member

  • Members w/Sub 1
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts
  • LocationBolingbrook, IL
  • Goldwing Model:GL1500SE
  • Model Year:1996
  • First Name:Paul
 

Posted 12 June 2017 - 07:36 PM

I have owned a 1200, 1500 and 1800.  My experience has been that the rears get eaten up pretty quickly on all 3.

Okay, you were right, (my tongue has a constant taste of shoe leather).  I just used a depth gauge on my tires and I'm a bit shocked.  The front has 5/32" left and the rear has 7/32" left.  So to me it appears as though the front has less tread and wearing out first, however, I never payed attention to the fact that the rear allegedly starts with 11/32" of tread and the front starts with 6/32" of tread, therefor the rear is about 1/2 gone and the front is about 1/3 gone.  The grooves look monstrous on the rear but the gauge doesn't lie. 

 

I better order another rear before they stop selling them.  I assume I shouldn't mix an E3 front with an E4 rear.   



#10 AZgl1800

 
AZgl1800

    Senior Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 786 posts
  • LocationLake Oologah, OK
  • Goldwing Model:GL1800
  • Model Year:2002
  • First Name:John
 

Posted 13 June 2017 - 11:45 AM

it won't matter if you have mixed tires, that is only true for cars/trucks with tires on the SAME AXLE.

 

you can use a bias ply on the rear of a bike, and a radial on the front, or the opposite....

 

you probably won't be able to tell which is which once you get moving on the highway.

 

 

I have an E3 on the front, and a Michelin RF on the rear... rides great.



#11 jobe05

 
jobe05

    Senior Member

  • Moderators
  • 2,461 posts
  • LocationKing NC
  • Goldwing Model:GL1800, GL1500
  • Model Year:2012, 1989
  • First Name:John
 

Posted 13 June 2017 - 05:53 PM

I was going to suggest what John did above. We had an issue with our 1500 and switched to a G709 on the front which is a radial and our issue went away. Mind you, we tried all the fixes that was described above to no avail also.

Be careful on that last few 32nds on the rear. It can go from good looking tread to cord in 100 miles. Did that with 3 different tires, shenko, Dunlop and a Michelin.

#12 kiptap

 
kiptap

    Member

  • Members w/Sub 1
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts
  • LocationBolingbrook, IL
  • Goldwing Model:GL1500SE
  • Model Year:1996
  • First Name:Paul
 

Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:38 PM

Be careful on that last few 32nds on the rear. It can go from good looking tread to cord in 100 miles. Did that with 3 different tires, shenko, Dunlop and a Michelin.

Oh that sounds like a winner when your trying to milk out the last few miles at the end of a season.  : BURN :







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Technology, GL1500, Dunlop E3, tires

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users