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Bringing '91 1500I out of 8 yr "wet" storage. What should I be MOST concerned with?



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#1 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 22 May 2017 - 02:50 AM

The bike was running fine, but parked/garaged (wet) due to rear brake problems.  I'm tired of seeing it "waste-away" and want to get it back on the road.  I'm draining/flushing all the fluids (brake, clutch, oil, radiator, fuel), and putting new spark plugs.  I worry that the rings/pistons will be an issue, anyone have any ideas on how to troubleshoot the pistons and loosen up the rings if they are "sticky"?  Any and all ideas would be helpful.



#2 Johnny R

 
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Posted 23 May 2017 - 11:58 AM

I would drop a little oil in each cylinder and start it up until engine warm. 



#3 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 23 May 2017 - 12:13 PM

Thats a good idea. I worry that the pistons and rings have "settled" a bit and the dry cylinders might cause havoc with the rings.  The oil will help, thanks.  I'll be changing the fluids and as much of the rubber lines/hoses as I can get to.  Thanks for your input JohnnyR, it'll be helpful and I'll get back on the road with fewer worries.



#4 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 24 May 2017 - 05:04 PM

Since I'm changing the timing belts & plugs, I figured I'd use the job to "oil up" each piston/rings set.  Leaving the plugs out, I heard that I should be able to use a socket/breaker bar on the cam to turn it slowly and get a feel for any "sticky" rings.  I'm putting Marvels Mystery oil (also from a suggestion from a member), in each cylinder and letting it sit for a while to penetrate/loosen any gunk.  I'm leaning toward about 2 ml of the oil in each piston.  The pistons are in different positions of their "stroke" so some have more room than others, but i'm hoping 2 ml will do the job.  ANY IDEAS???



#5 jobe05

 
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Posted 24 May 2017 - 06:39 PM

If your using Marvel Mystery oil, it won;t take much, 2 mil is fine.  After you are satisfied that the engine is fine (which I think it will be),  Dump the rest of the mystery oil in the crank case and leave it in there till your ready to change the oil.  Some people leave it in for about 100 miles, but since your not driving the bike (guessing here), I would just get the engine running and wile your doing maintenance, run the bike so the oil can do it's magic till your ready to change the oil.

 

After you have it running, you can add an ounce or two of TWC two cycle oil to the gas which will help keep the top end of the engine lubricated.  When I drove my 1500, I use to add an ounce at ever other tank fill up and could hear the difference in the engine and got a little better fuel mileage.

 

Edit:  I should add, before you use the TWC oil, you should dump the old gas, get fresh gas in there with a can of SeaFoam.  The seafoam will help clean the carbs if it's not to late and they are all gummed up.



#6 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 24 May 2017 - 07:04 PM

Sounds great.  I've never used Mystery oil before so I'm interested to see the results.  There are going to be lots of hose/rubber lines replacing too but, as long as the engine is in shape, I'll feel assured it'll run fine.  The two-cycle oil trick is new to me but it sounds like great advice.  I can't wait to try it out.  Thanks for the input and helping me get this puppy back in shape. 



#7 CG_C-130_Nav

 
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Posted 28 May 2017 - 04:59 PM

Marvel Mystery Oil is great stuff, it can also help with water pumps and such. When I was able to work the water pump was going out in my bucket-van, so I poured a bit in the radiator and it made most of the squeak go away and kept it on the road until I got a new bucket-truck.



#8 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 28 May 2017 - 05:24 PM

Thanks for the positive comments on Mystery Oil, , it shows that I've been out of the "loop" for way too long.  Because of the angle of the spark plugs versus the "horizontal" angle of the pistons, how the hell do I get mystery oil onto the "TOP" part of the piston/rings?, , , or should I even worry about it?

 

I'm getting ready to pull the timing belt covers and turn the crank shaft in the next couple of days.  Which brings me to another question, , , Shouldn't I be trying to turn the "crank shaft" as opposed to the "cam shafts"?, , , I thought the cam shafts dealt with the valves, and NOT the pistons, ,  ,whereas turning the crank shaft moves the pistons AND the valves.   If this is a stupid question, pls disregard, , hahaha



#9 jobe05

 
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Posted 28 May 2017 - 09:20 PM

The cam shaft is turned by the belts that are off the crank shaft in the center of the engine, if you turn on of the, the two can shafts will turn with the crank shaft.

Personally........ I would put a charge to the battery and turn the key myself, I'd bet she'd turn right over.

As far as getting the mystery oil into the cylinders, I have a small funnel that has a rubber hose attached to it for things like this

#10 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 28 May 2017 - 10:49 PM

OK, thanks.  Its all good advice and I appreciate the input.  I have a better understanding of what to do now.  GREAT GROUP HERE!!!!



#11 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 29 May 2017 - 10:05 PM

Just a quick update;,  , , , cylinders had a few ml's of mystery oil in each of em, , took off the timing belt covers and turned the crank shaft (plugs out) half a dozen times  without any problems!! It took less than 5 lbs pressure to turn the crankshaft and it "felt" smooth without any sticky spots or squeaks.  New timing belts (Gates T275's) came in and I'll be putting them on tomorrow (hopefully).  Lots of hose/rubber  and brake line replacing still ahead, but I'm satisfied the mystery oil will resolve my worries about the pistons/rings.  THANKS AGAIN TO EVERYONE WHO SPOKE UP WITH HELPFUL TIPS!!! 

 

Keep the rubber side down!!



#12 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 01 June 2017 - 01:42 PM

New timing belts went on without a hitch. Tackling the hoses,lines and fluids should be a breeze now.

#13 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:28 PM

I upgraded the brake lines to "steel" lines but got a HUGE surprise with the front left brake!! The front left is activated with the "REAR" brake pedal. I put on new "speed-bleeders" too.  Front line bled fine, no bubbles, clean fluid coming out into "catch jar".  The surprise is; I'M GETTING NO BRAKES ON FRONT AND PEDAL GOES STRAIGHT TO THE FLOORBOARD! Looking at the front brake, I see the pad (opposite the cylinder/piston side) isn't touching the rotor.  Its less than 1mm from the rotor disc and "daylight" is clearly visible.  While waiting for new steel lines, and speed bleeders, I took the front wheel out to "clean/polish" the rim.  I might have jarred the cylinder/piston when I removed that caliper to get the front wheel off but the caliper easily went back on, and mounted fine when i put the wheel back on before I changed the "lines" and speed-bleeders.

 

Is it possible that the cylinder/pistons in that left caliper are seized or damaged and the hydraulic pressure isn't enough to make the piston extend the brake pad to the disc properly?  If so, what is the most accepted way to deal with it?  Any help/tips would be helpful, , Thanks.



#14 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 4 weeks ago

Problem solved! I decided to try tapping the caliper housing with a smallish hard plastic mallet, while pumping the pedal. Brake pad snapped as it seated against the rotor. No more "daylight" between the brake pad and rotor. Brake pedal is firm and like new. I going to flush the clutch next. The new speed bleeders made me a "believer"! They are a breeze for bleeding brakes.
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#15 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

New oil, oil filter, and coolant onboard.  Waiting for new air filter, and sub air filter cleaner to arrive. . . .

 

I decided to tackle the broken hook latches on both side pockets on the trunk.  I didn't find anything I liked on YouTube, or discussion sites around so I McGwyver'd a closing system using the invisible force of "Magnetism".  Nothing looks different about the outside of the side pockets and it should solve the "flapping door" syndrome that would drive me crazy.  I posted the idea on this site with a brief "how-to" guide.  I don't know if side pockets are "standardized" so be prepared to modify, tweak, or experiment with the idea.  I hope it helps one of you folks.


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#16 AZgl1800

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

that is a good "out of the box" fix for a broken latch.

 

I love magnetic door fasteners



#17 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 3 weeks ago

I just added about a dozen pictures to accompany the original thread with the "how-to" instructions. I hope it helps at least one of you good folks. BTW, I agree that magnetic fasteners are cool. Thanks for your view and positive comment.

#18 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted 2 weeks ago

New gear oil in final drive. Clutch line bled and should be fine. New gas (half tank) w/seafoam additive (1oz./gallon). I discovered the throttle was tight, and sticking. Lube'd the throttle cables so throttle should be fine. Went with the K&N air filter for better air flow; charged it and good to go. I'm ready to button it up and try to start it up. We'll see how the carbs are and if the seafoam helps clean em up.

#19 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted A week ago

IT'S ALIVE!!!!!
Throttle and choke cables lubed, no "sticking" on throttle return.

She started up and purred like a kitten, , ,Surprising as hell for sure. I noticed a bit more exhaust smoke but I'm hoping it's due to the oil I put in the cylinders before I turned the crank to check for "piston seizure".

Now for the real HARD work of getting all the plastic back on correctly and hitting the road.

THANKS TO ALL YOUR HELP AND TIPS, , ,y'all succeeded in putting one more Goldwing back on the road.

Thanks again fo everything, , ,

#20 Bluthundr31

 
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Posted A week ago

WHOOOOOPPSSSS,   I guess I'm gonna have to "cool my jets".  The bike started right up and the engine sounded perrrrfect, , , , but only for about 5 or 6 "start-ups".  All together, it ran smooth for about 15-20 minutes but, , the "dreaded" fuel problems have caused a NO START condition.  

 

I had a suspicion that the old gas sitting in the tank/carbs were going to be a problem but I'd hoped that draining the tank, putting fresh fuel and seafoam might help avoid any problems.  I wasn't THAT lucky.

 

Since the bike ran so dam well to start with, should that indicate that the vacuum hoses are still in decent shape, and do not need to be replaced at this point?

 

After trying to start it choked, and lots of throttle, I checked the plugs and they were bone-dry, like no fuel getting to the cylinders.  

 

The fuel filter is new (OEM) and since its the easiest to check, I'll do that first thing tomorrow.  If its "gunk'd" up I'll put on a new spare, or clean it out and try this again.

 

If that doesn't work, I'm thinking of starting with a check at the fuel pump to confirm the pressure, and gph output.  I'll be checking for some decent posts on how to best/easiest way to check this, but if any of you have ideas or tips, please speak up.

 

If the fuel filter is OK, and the fuel pump is OK, I'll have to look at the carbs and prepare for a rebuild. 

 

Does this "plan" of attack sound reasonable?  Let me know if anyone has other ideas.







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